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HMS King George V
Published 2 months ago
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A Lego model of the WWII battleship HMS King George V, the lead ship in its class of 5 (which also included Prince of Wales, Duke of York, Anson, and Howe). The scale is 5 ft./stud, or 1:190.

While it is easy to point out the flaws in the King George V battleships, especially their comparatively light BL 14 inch primary guns, their track record was very good, with two of the ships in the class playing important roles in the sinking of two enemy battleships (King George V vs. Bismarck and Duke of York vs. Scharnhorst). Much like their American counterparts, the KGVs had excellent fire control and AA batteries, although the KGVs relied on the somewhat less effective 2-pounder, rather than the 40mm Bofors mounted on the US battleships.

One of the great things about the KGVs, from a Lego modeling point of view, is that they were built almost without any sheer, either forward or aft. Based on their experience in naval battles like Jutland, the Royal Navy planned for most engagements to occur in the bad weather and rough seas typical of the North Sea. They expected that ships would open fire at relatively short ranges and fire at almost flat trajectories. Based on these expectations, the Royal Navy made it a requirement that its capital ships be able to fire over the bow at zero degrees elevation, so very little sheer forward was possible. That design made the decks of the ships "wetter," but did give them a little more tactical flexibility. From a modeling standpoint, it means that it is much easier to shape the bow and stern than on many other warships, since the deck height barely changes.
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5 models | 604 views
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